Wave Type Comparison

Guinn Partners conducted an independent study of boat makes and models to accurately compare wave quality.  Videos and our methodology are below.
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Testing Methodology

This study tested various makes and models of boats to determine an accurate wave quality comparison. All boats were set up using factory ballast. The following core characteristics of each boat’s wave were measured:

 

Test Parameters:
•Riders were north of 200LBS +/- 15 lbs. of one another), at least six feet in height (+/- 3 inches of one another), and skill level (Intermediate) surfers were used if not the same person.
• Surf Boards: Identical surf boards were used in each test.
• Settings: All boats tested with factory presets or factory recommended settings including Ballast & Surf System. No extra ballast was added to the boats. If Plug N Play was an available option and installed at the factory, then the recommended sacks where connected and utilized.
• Water Conditions: Boats were tested side by side and in the same depth, speed & water surface conditions.

 

Wave Length: To calculate the wave length, the length of the boat was used as a foundation, which was a set figure. The height of the rider and the perspective of the shot were used as additional values to accurately measure the length of the wave. The beginning of the wave was measured after the swim platform and after the wave has generated. The wave was considered rideable in our study as long as the rider could return to the pocket. Once they drifted past the apex of the wave into a non-rideable area, the wave length calculation was stopped to arrive at a total wave length measurement.

 

Wave Height: Similarly to the wave length, the wave height was measured by using the length of the boat was used as a foundation, which was a set figure. The height of the rider and the perspective of the shot were used as additional values to accurately measure the height of the wave. The rideable height was determined by measuring the surface of the water to the apex of the rideable wave at the highest rideable point.

 

Pocket Size: The pocket is the rideable area measuring the square footage of the rideable pocket of the wave. This area was calculated by examining the height, rideable length, and surface of the pocket, or “sweet spot” that riders utilize most. These calculations were also verified using the length of the boat was used as a foundation, which was a set figure. The height of the rider and the perspective of the shot were used as additional values to accurately measure the pocket size.

 

Face Quality: The wave face quality is a 1 out of 10 scoring system that takes in to account the smoothness, curve, and noise patterns of the wave as it extends behind the watercraft to arrive at an overall score describing the wave’s quality. Cleaner waves with less noise and breakup at the apex will yield a higher score. Waves that have more noise and breakup spray as the water moves towards the apex will yield a lower score. Waves that have more turbulence overall will also result in a lower face quality score.

Malibu 25 LSV vs Nautique G23

Malibu 24 MXZ vs Nautique G23

Malibu 22 LSV vs Mastercraft XT22

Axis T23 vs Moomba Mojo

Malibu 24 MXZ vs Mastercraft x23

Axis A22 vs Mastercraft NXT 22

Malibu M235 vs Nautique G23

Malibu 23LSV vs Nautique G23

*Malibu supported this testing with boats and equipment.

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